Tag Archives: dark grey

Dark Eyed Junco

Dark-eyed Junco

Dark-eyed Juncos are ground sparrows and they very much enjoy foraging. They hop around shrubs and through forests searching out seed. You will often hear high chirp notes as they move around. Plentiful in our part of the country during winter. We saw a couple by the lake today but these photos were taken a couple of weeks ago. No camera today. The journey today included binoculars only. The Bald Eagle was present all day, it departed three minutes prior to my arrival. Go figure.

Dark-eyed Junco
Dark-eyed Junco
  • Aperture: ƒ/6.3
  • Camera: Canon EOS REBEL T3i
  • Taken: 8 December, 2012
  • Focal length: 300mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Shutter speed: 1/60s

Dark-Eyed Junco
Dark-Eyed Junco
  • Aperture: ƒ/6.3
  • Camera: Canon EOS REBEL T3i
  • Taken: 8 December, 2012
  • Focal length: 300mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Shutter speed: 1/60s

Dark Eyed Junco
Dark Eyed Junco
  • Aperture: ƒ/6.3
  • Camera: Canon EOS REBEL T3i
  • Taken: 8 December, 2012
  • Focal length: 300mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Shutter speed: 1/80s

Robin migration on the Brazos

Robins Robins Robins

As usual, click an image to enlarge.

Robins migration on the Brazos watering
Robins migration on the Brazos watering
  • Aperture: ƒ/8
  • Camera: Canon EOS REBEL T3i
  • Taken: 26 November, 2012
  • Focal length: 300mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Shutter speed: 1/250s

The American Robin migration that settled at Oaks Crossing just south of Mineral Wells, Texas (North Central Texas) was only the fourth time in my life where I had witnessed such an event. To this day, I am not sure if it was a migration, a gathering, or a concert. What I do know is that they face in all directions and have a high watch standing LP for inbound traffic. With the defense watch intact, they leisurely drink and bathe all along the water’s edge. The whirring of my camera bothered them none but any approach would not be tolerated.

Robins migration on the Brazos River
Robins migration on the Brazos River
  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: Canon EOS REBEL T3i
  • Taken: 26 November, 2012
  • Focal length: 300mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Shutter speed: 1/640s

Robin migration on the Brazos
Robin migration on the Brazos
  • Aperture: ƒ/8
  • Camera: Canon EOS REBEL T3i
  • Taken: 26 November, 2012
  • Focal length: 300mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Shutter speed: 1/320s

Short fact: The American Robin is the largest, most abundant North American thrush. The Robin has a loud and musical voice, makes it one of the most easily recognizable birds in North America. “Red Robin, Yummmm!” The diet of the robin is highly variable, changing from primarily earthworms, in spring and summer, to primarily fruit in autumn and winter. During the non-breeding season, large flocks of hundreds or thousands of immature and adult birds migrate to lower elevations, where they form roosting aggregations from which they track sources of berries. The river is heavy with them at the moment. The birds are supposedly more wary than they are when on the breeding grounds. Not all robin populations are migratory, however, some spending the winter months close to their breeding grounds.

Oaks Crossing on the Brazos River
Oaks Crossing - Good Bird Habitat
  • Aperture: ƒ/7.1
  • Camera: Canon EOS REBEL T3i
  • Taken: 26 November, 2012
  • Focal length: 105mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Shutter speed: 1/500s

Purple Martin

The Purple Martin of Possum Kingdom

On one of our trips to Possum Kingdom lake, Desi and I came across a flock of juvenile and female Purple Martins. The Martins were swarming around a Mockingbird and a couple of Eurasian Doves that were chilling out in the top of a large tree. The Martin is the largest of the North American swallows. The male is dark in color, while the juvenile has a lighter color breast and underpants. The female is bluish black on back and a dingy gray brown chest with a gray collar around back of neck. These were young missing some of the markings but their flight, behavior and tail shape is unmistakable.

Purple Martin
Purple Martin
  • Aperture: ƒ/8
  • Camera: X-S1
  • Taken: 30 June, 2012
  • Focal length: 109.3mm
  • ISO: 400
  • Shutter speed: 1/1200s

Purple Martin
Purple Martin
  • Aperture: ƒ/8
  • Camera: X-S1
  • Taken: 30 June, 2012
  • Focal length: 158.6mm
  • ISO: 400
  • Shutter speed: 1/900s

Purple Martin Underpants
Purple Martin Underpants
  • Aperture: ƒ/8
  • Camera: X-S1
  • Taken: 30 June, 2012
  • Focal length: 109.3mm
  • ISO: 400
  • Shutter speed: 1/1100s

Purple Martin Black & White
Purple Martin Flock Black & White
  • Aperture: ƒ/8
  • Camera: X-S1
  • Taken: 30 June, 2012
  • Focal length: 105.2mm
  • ISO: 400
  • Shutter speed: 1/1600s

Western_Kingbird_adult

Western Kingbird

The wife is at work, so I take a walk in the neighborhood. It was a bright, clear day. In fact, it was a bit bright and late for photography. During the walk, I saw two very distinct looking birds diving into the trees a couple of blocks over. They were decent size raptors, grey in color with white heads. So, I walk over. Upon my arrival, I discover a couple of Western Kingbirds fighting over the right to a tall tree branch. The winner was NOT well rewarded. I captured a couple of photos of the squawking bird when this raptor took the Kingbird right out of my frame and into a nearby tree. The raptor, I later discovered was a Mississippi Kite. WOW! Our Oaks are FULL of cicadas and the noise must have drawn them in… more on them in another post. Enlarge the photo below and look in the top left corner. Pure luck!

Western Kingbirds are very common throughout Palo Pinto county; especially, throughout my neighborhood. Their bright yellow underpants are hard to miss. One of the shots I captured was sorta rare, the red crest on top of the head is rarely seen. Photo also seen at Texas Bird Images.

Western Kingbird Victim of Kite
Kingbird about to be victim of a Kite
  • Aperture: ƒ/8
  • Camera: X-S1
  • Taken: 23 June, 2012
  • Focal length: 118mm
  • ISO: 400
  • Shutter speed: 1/1200s

American Robin

American Robin

The American Robin is one of my most sought after birds for photographing. They are literally everywhere in the neighborhood above us, I can never seem to catch them when the light is right. So, I apologize for the weak captures. To be honest, I have a problem locating and shooting any red-bodied bird. My camera HATES focusing on red. Strange! There are several red species on my local list and I have not had much success, but there is always tomorrow and another excuse.

American Robins are a fairly large bodied songbird. They have a round body, long legs, and fairly long tail. They are one of the largest North American thrushes. Robins are popular birds for their bright orange breast. These birds are very territorial and do not share well with others. I have heard stories from people that Robins have attacked windows due to reflections. This can go on for days.

The eggs and nest are what one would envision when thinking of birds. A deep cup with bright blue eggs.

American Robin Nest
Deep cup and blue eggs
  • Aperture: ƒ/3.1
  • Camera: FINEPIX S4250
  • Taken: 4 April, 2012
  • Focal length: 4.3mm
  • ISO: 400
  • Shutter speed: 1/5s

American Robin
American Robin
  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: X-S1
  • Taken: 21 July, 2012
  • Focal length: 158.6mm
  • ISO: 400
  • Shutter speed: 1/200s