Tag Archives: American Robin

Pine Siskin

Backyard Bird Friends

My backyard bird friends will soon be changing homes here in Palo Pinto county. Looking forward to the migratory influx.

Pine Siskin
Pine Siskin
Female Northern Cardinal
Female Northern Cardinal
Red-breasted Nuthatch
Red-breasted Nuthatch
Carolina Chickadee
Carolina Chickadee
Three Amigos
Three Amigos
American Robin
American Robin
American Goldfinch
American Goldfinch
Robin migration on the Brazos

Robins Robins Robins

As usual, click an image to enlarge.

Robins migration on the Brazos watering
Robins migration on the Brazos watering
  • Aperture: ƒ/8
  • Camera: Canon EOS REBEL T3i
  • Taken: 26 November, 2012
  • Focal length: 300mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Shutter speed: 1/250s

The American Robin migration that settled at Oaks Crossing just south of Mineral Wells, Texas (North Central Texas) was only the fourth time in my life where I had witnessed such an event. To this day, I am not sure if it was a migration, a gathering, or a concert. What I do know is that they face in all directions and have a high watch standing LP for inbound traffic. With the defense watch intact, they leisurely drink and bathe all along the water’s edge. The whirring of my camera bothered them none but any approach would not be tolerated.

Robins migration on the Brazos River
Robins migration on the Brazos River
  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: Canon EOS REBEL T3i
  • Taken: 26 November, 2012
  • Focal length: 300mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Shutter speed: 1/640s

Robin migration on the Brazos
Robin migration on the Brazos
  • Aperture: ƒ/8
  • Camera: Canon EOS REBEL T3i
  • Taken: 26 November, 2012
  • Focal length: 300mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Shutter speed: 1/320s

Short fact: The American Robin is the largest, most abundant North American thrush. The Robin has a loud and musical voice, makes it one of the most easily recognizable birds in North America. “Red Robin, Yummmm!” The diet of the robin is highly variable, changing from primarily earthworms, in spring and summer, to primarily fruit in autumn and winter. During the non-breeding season, large flocks of hundreds or thousands of immature and adult birds migrate to lower elevations, where they form roosting aggregations from which they track sources of berries. The river is heavy with them at the moment. The birds are supposedly more wary than they are when on the breeding grounds. Not all robin populations are migratory, however, some spending the winter months close to their breeding grounds.

Oaks Crossing on the Brazos River
Oaks Crossing - Good Bird Habitat
  • Aperture: ƒ/7.1
  • Camera: Canon EOS REBEL T3i
  • Taken: 26 November, 2012
  • Focal length: 105mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Shutter speed: 1/500s

Oaks Crossing on the Brazos River

Oaks Crossing on the Brazos River

There is a well used crossing on the Brazos River in North Central Texas. It is known by most in the Mineral Wells area as Oaks Crossing. It has a reputation for being a party place and a quick short cut if you don’t mind wading through a shallow river in your truck. Desi and I use it as a quiet place to get-a-way but that is hit and miss. Weather and people can put a quick stop to a quiet day. Desi spends her time trying to get close to this particular Great Blue Heron that wants NO PART OF HER. 75 yards is it. I returned the following day and the Heron casually flies over me. Pictured in gallery. You know to click on an image to enlarge, right?

Oaks Crossing on the Brazos River
Oaks Crossing on the Brazos River
  • Aperture: ƒ/7.1
  • Camera: Canon EOS REBEL T3i
  • Taken: 26 November, 2012
  • Focal length: 105mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Shutter speed: 1/500s

To me, Oaks Crossing has become a place for bird watching (birding). More especially in the Fall. Migrating birds use the river as a watering hole on their way south. The foliage is heavy, berries are abundant and water is nearly always plentiful. This year, Robins and Cardinals made heavy appearances two days in a row. I learned tons about Robins during those few days. Did you know, they keep lookouts? Strange but true. Luckily I was there to witness the events. This past summer I could not get a decent photo of the neighboring Robins. They have become very shy in my little niche of the planet. This past week, I could not throw a rock without hitting one at Oaks Crossing. Cardinals were plentiful but not quite as thick. Most of them should stay in the area.

Robins on the Brazos River
Robins day one
  • Aperture: ƒ/8
  • Camera: Canon EOS REBEL T3i
  • Taken: 26 November, 2012
  • Focal length: 300mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Shutter speed: 1/320s

So, if you are rolling around North Central Texas and feel like wading in calf deep water, short hikes and bird watching… hit 281 from Mineral Wells, Texas. Travel south for a few miles and turn right onto Oaks Crossing Road. Follow it till you hear the splash. PLEASE DON’T LITTER. If one looks closely at the Robin pics, one would find a few disturbing items sitting in and on the water. Glass bottles.

Cardinals Day Two
Cardinals on the Brazos River
  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: Canon EOS REBEL T3i
  • Taken: 26 November, 2012
  • Focal length: 300mm
  • ISO: 200
  • Shutter speed: 1/250s

American Robin

American Robin

The American Robin is one of my most sought after birds for photographing. They are literally everywhere in the neighborhood above us, I can never seem to catch them when the light is right. So, I apologize for the weak captures. To be honest, I have a problem locating and shooting any red-bodied bird. My camera HATES focusing on red. Strange! There are several red species on my local list and I have not had much success, but there is always tomorrow and another excuse.

American Robins are a fairly large bodied songbird. They have a round body, long legs, and fairly long tail. They are one of the largest North American thrushes. Robins are popular birds for their bright orange breast. These birds are very territorial and do not share well with others. I have heard stories from people that Robins have attacked windows due to reflections. This can go on for days.

The eggs and nest are what one would envision when thinking of birds. A deep cup with bright blue eggs.

American Robin Nest
Deep cup and blue eggs
  • Aperture: ƒ/3.1
  • Camera: FINEPIX S4250
  • Taken: 4 April, 2012
  • Focal length: 4.3mm
  • ISO: 400
  • Shutter speed: 1/5s

American Robin
American Robin
  • Aperture: ƒ/5.6
  • Camera: X-S1
  • Taken: 21 July, 2012
  • Focal length: 158.6mm
  • ISO: 400
  • Shutter speed: 1/200s